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Professional learning doesn’t have to be face to face

Professional learning doesn’t have to be face to face

History Tech

One of the most enjoyable things I get to do is finding things that make life better and easier for teachers and students. Sometimes those things are online sites and tools. Sometimes those things are ideas that teachers share. And sometimes those things are products that are created here at ESSDACK.

Today I want to share three products that we’ve designed specifically to support social studies teachers in their own professional learning and as they teach historical thinking skills. Our goal is simple – find ways to help teachers learn in non-traditional ways. For years at ESSDACK, we’ve worked to create quality face-to-face professional learning opportunities.

But we also want to offer tools and products that encourage you to learn and work where and when is best for you. So I’ve created a few products that you can use as

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Posted by on October 2, 2016 in Uncategorized

 

School Management Systems – Looking For Nessie

The other day I blogged about School Management Systems, and why we love to hate them. Today I would like to look at the change management side of transferring from one system to another. Any change is threatening to staff: there is a double threat of increased workload, or of redundancy! This can lead to resistance. A new SMS can therefore loom large in the imagination as a shadowy threat that might or might not exist, a Loch Ness Monster of a thing! On the one hand it is seductive, but a vague sense of menace is never far from the mind.

But of course Nessie does not exist, and like a bad dream disappears as your gaze dispels the shadows! From the ra-ra-ra of the sales pitch, eventually comes the training. I must say that I have really enjoyed the training with Engage. I don’t usually plug proprietary products, but I will make this exception because it is germane to the discussion that follows. What sold me on the platform was its combination of ease of use and sense of enormous potential. This is an unusual combination. If you’ve read my thoughts on Moodle, a powerful Learning Management System often lambasted for being hard for teachers to learn, you will know that I believe that ultimately it is the power under the hood that gives a platform its traction. My hope for Moodle is that once teachers have got used to the idea of an LMS like Google Classroom, which is easy to use, but lacks functionality, they will slowly graduate to Moodle! With Engage I don’t believe this is a problem as it combines a very user-friendly interface with huge functionality.

Educational Technology and change are hot topics,but the relationship is often assumed to be unproblematic. Nothing could be further from the truth. By educational technology I mean hardware such as computers, tablets, paper, books and school buildings as well as software such as Moodle, PowerPoint or Excel. But I also mean processes. Crop Rotation is a technology, and pedagogy itself can be seen as educational technology.

A useful way of looking at how educational technology impacts upon process and decision-making, is to see them as either relatively hard or soft. Hard here means that it strongly determines the form processes take, while Soft indicates that processes are relatively weakly determined. For example the size of a school building strongly determines what kinds of activities can be conducted inside it. If a school hall can seat a hundred, but there are five hundred children in the school, full school assemblies are not able to be held in the Hall, but would have to be held on the Field, which can accommodate many more. Things like school buildings are not easy to change. Sometimes people try to do so by adding temporary partitions and the like, but generally speaking buildings, once erected tend to make other activities conform to them rather than the other way round.

Human beings, on the other hand, are far more adaptable. We probably owe the existence of our species to this. We are able to make changes quickly and effectively. When there is a time-table clash, for example, teachers are even able to be in two places at the same time, as anyone who has ever taught one class, and looked after a colleague’s next door, can attest. Pedagogy is thus a soft technology. Teachers will often change teaching method in mid sentence if they see that an approach is not working.

School Management Systems are relatively hard technologies in that they often determine a work-flow process or what decisions are possible. For example on a web-based form a required field might block an online application if the applicant cannot supply a value. The more flexible, therefore, the better. It is not ideal that decisions are driven by factors other than ensuring optimum efficiency. The core business of any school is education, and all activities should be subservient to that. Since logically pedagogy is the technology with the greatest effect on learning, all technologies within a school should be softer than pedagogy,

This is seldom the case. A Constructivist teacher timetabled to teach in a lecture theatre will find it hard to conduct student-centred lessons, and is much more likely to revert to Instructivist methodologies in response. This is one of the great contradictions of schooling over which even administrators have little control. Making sure that you are using the softest, ie. the most flexible School Management System is therefore crucial.

The quest for a soft SMS may well be chimerical, but should be undertaken nonetheless.

What sold me on Engage was thus a sense that it was far more flexible in its features than other SMSs, certainly than the one we are currently using, and that it has the power to conform to best educational practices rather than determine them. Much like Nessie this is a mythical beast many hope to find, and is well worth the quest!

 

School Management Systems – A Necessary Evil?

Nobody loves their School Management System. It can never do everything you need it to do, and over time the things that get in the way of being more efficient somehow seem to get larger, and what you liked about the system begins to shrink in comparison. You begin to curse its name whenever a report prints with a sudden and random font face change, when not all the names in a class list pop up on your screen, or when random students are added to the netball team for no apparent reason!

img_20160927_115307So it was with some trepidation that I set out to attend a one day user group conference for our new School Management System, Engage. There’s nothing I like less than product sell presentations, so the prospect of a whole day of ra-ra-ra filled me with dread.

By School Management System (SMS) I do not mean a Learning Management System (LMS) such as Moodle or Google Classroom, although some SMSs include an LMS component. An LMS deals with classroom management, facilitating the storage of learning materials, assignment submission and online grading, discussion and feedback. School Management Systems, on the other hand deal with school management, attendance, administration, fees, asset control, reporting and so on. Not everyone makes this distinction, but I think it is important to differentiate between the two functions, even when they come in the same package.

Both are vital in the 21st Century school.There are still teachers who use paper grade books or hand-write their lesson plans, but increasingly one of the great benefits of using technology is to free teachers from some of the drudge of recreating learning materials. I remember when cyclostyled worksheets were the order of the day. Each year they had to be re-created. A computer allows materials that work to be edited rather than endlessly re-typed, allowing energy to go into creating new materials. Technology has also allowed text only resources to become more multi-media and interactive. One of the huge advantages of a good LMS is the ability to store these resources online within learning plans that can be edited and good to go in a much shorter time.

Similarly the advent of the SMS has revolutionized school administration. This is not something that I think about very often. As a teacher I have a very hazy notion of what goes on inside the school office. I know they answer phones a lot, and send messages out about how so-and-so will be late because their puppy died, and provide us with class lists and newsletters and stuff. But teachers are either in their classrooms teaching or whinging in the staff room, and seldom question the amount of school administration that supports work at the chalk-face.

This year I was asked to give up some of my classroom duties to become the systems administrator for our new SMS. I have suddenly had to learn a great deal about school admin as a whole, and hence the conference. Perhaps the most important factor to consider is the level of support that the SMS provider offers. Support tickets that go unanswered are the last thing you want, and a good Help Desk is worth any number of features. The main reason we decided to switch SMS was in fact the lack of support. This is not to say that the features offered by an SMS are not important. Of course it is. Much of the Engage User Conference dealt in fact with new features, some specifically developed for South Africa.

For many schools different software packages have been cobbled together to do different tasks. A School Management System really needs to be a one stop shop, integrating different features within the school. A prime requirement is to find a system which can replace different applications as seamlessly as possible. However, it also needs to be user-friendly so that even the most Luddite teacher can use it. It should be secure, and meet privacy requirements. This is a tall order, and might explain why levels of satisfaction with an SMS often fall after the honeymoon starts to wear off.

Engage manages to be both a user-friendly and a feature rich package which includes Accounts, Fees, Administration and Learning Management Systems. In presentations which whip through everything any software has to offer I have to admit to a certain inattention. It is all a bit bewildering. At this Conference we have a software developer from the UK skyping us on the big screen walking us through using the gradebook. What strikes me the most is the necessity of great flexibility to suit every school’s way of doing things. Schools are such wonderfully idiosyncratic places! In discussions over lunch we talk about the timetabling module. Each school has a different set of criteria. I feel for the software developers, having to try to satisfy so many different needs.

I am crucially aware of what awaits me trying to sell the changes to my staff, who are used to doing things on other systems. I have a feeling I will have my work cut out for me.

 

Ed tech is good for kids. Except when it isn’t.

Ed tech is good for kids. Except when it isn’t.

History Tech

Some things just don’t make sense when we first try wrapping our heads around them. The balloon should move backwards like everything else in the car. Working together to solve a problem makes sense. Chilling water at 150 degrees to 32 degrees should be harder to do than chilling water that starts at 75 degrees.

Only it’s not.

How about this one?

  • Ed tech is good for kids. Except when it’s not.

The whole point of History Tech is focused on finding ways to integrate technology into social studies best practices. Ed tech is a good thing. Ed tech can be used to support data collection and analysis, critical thinking, collaboration, problem solving, communication. It’s a good thing.

Except when it’s not.

Recent research seems to suggest that…

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Posted by on September 23, 2016 in Uncategorized

 

Making a Database in Moodle

educational research techniques

For those of us who are not tech-savvy, the idea of making a database can sound very intimidating. However, a database is not as mysterious or difficult to create as you may think.

A database is strictly is just an organized way of collecting and storing records. If you ever made a list of your CD or book collection this is in many ways a highly simplified database.

Moodle allows a teacher to create a database to allow students to upload and or share information for whatever purpose. The secret to developing a database is to know what information you want it to store. After this, you just select the fields in Moodle to complete the database.

This post will explain how to develop a database in Moodle based on particular needs. We will make a database that stores information about Asian food.

  1. After logging into Moodle you need to…

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Posted by on September 15, 2016 in Uncategorized

 

Confessions of a Hair Rebel

I am not black and I am not a woman, so I feel hesitant to comment about the hair protests which have swept through girl’s schools in South Africa over the last year or so. But as a hair rebel when I was at school, I do feel qualified to add some of my own perspectives, not to attempt to co-opt the brave voices of the girls who are asserting their identities through these protests, but to set the current debate against some kind of context. In David Sherwin’s brilliant script for the Lindsay Anderson film IF (1968), a stinging satire of English Public Schools, the headmaster remarks: “So often I’ve noticed that… it’s the hair rebels who step into the breach when there’s a crisis… whether it be a fire in the house… or to sacrifice a week’s holiday… in order to give a party of slum children seven days in the country.”

When I was at school, not an English Public School, I hasten to add, the hair code was simple. Boy’s hair had to be off the collar and off the ears: short back and sides! How much you left on top was what defined you. Hair rebels were those whose hair length endangered both ears and collars and who exploited the lack of clarity about how much of a fringe you were allowed to the maximum. My own reaction to hair codes was shaped by my perception that short hair, linked to the military conscription which faced all white males in South Africa under Apartheid, symbolized Apartheid itself. The Afrikaans phrase min hare baie dae [short hair, many days] indicated how long one still had left to serve in the army!

The 1979 film Hair, of course, established an alternative vision of hirsute freedom, social liberation and the kind of laissez-faire abandon with which I preferred to identify. In the Afros and braids on the front line of the current hair revolt we can discern similar rallying cries against cultural hegemony, and a South Africa which has undergone change, but no real transformation. Containing black hair, policing black hair is, in many schools, still an issue. Let me say that I don’t think it is an issue of racism primarily. Many of the teachers most vocal in condemning some of the extravagantly provocative Afros we see these days are themselves black. Few of the former Model C or private schools actually ban Afros. But the Afro represents a strident call for the recognition for the need for transformation in a society which saw social transformation surrendered in favour of a neo-liberal agenda which allowed South Africa to remain in the good books of the bankers, but saw inequality widen, and the interests of workers in general, and the black working class in particular sacrificed for the rise of a small black elite.

As teachers we need to support, absolutely the rights of students and parents to regulate their hair as they see fit. Reasonable school rules usually reference neatness alone, and I have no problem with that. We need to recognise that hair rebels, while perhaps not so saintly as to rescue babies from burning buildings, are often at the forefront of challenging what is wrong at the roots of our society!

 
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Posted by on September 7, 2016 in Miscellaneous, Uncategorized

 

A Better Learning Experience

edtechdigest.com

Thinking smarter about space to support classroom technology. 

GUEST COLUMN | by Sean Corcorran

CREDIT Steelcase img.jpgAs in every other enterprise, educators have discovered that using new technology to improve results can be a slow and sometimes hit-or-miss process. Educators are hampered as well by a natural divide that separates teachers, who are technology adopters, from students, who are digital natives.

For a number of years, researchers have been visiting classrooms to observe firsthand how middle school teachers to university faculty are negotiating the digital divide. They’re dedicated to learning how to support teachers on their journey to become learning coaches.

We’ve moved from dealing with disciplinary problems to dealing with satisfying students’ enthusiasm to complete their tasks.

Our own observations are influenced by new understandings of learning that show students learn best when they use a range of tools. This research encourages a multi-sensory approach to teaching and learning, something that…

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Posted by on September 3, 2016 in Uncategorized

 
 
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